Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts

Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts #2019

Votes for Women A Play in Three Acts England Jean a young and somewhat ignorant woman is engaged to the politician Stonor who is up for election for Cabinet Minister At her aunt Lady John s house she meets the beautiful and myst
  • Title: Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts
  • Author: Elizabeth Robins
  • ISBN: 9781409982067
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1907 England Jean, a young and somewhat ignorant woman, is engaged to the politician Stonor, who is up for election for Cabinet Minister At her aunt Lady John s house, she meets the beautiful and mysterious Miss Levering, an independent lady who has lived through a great deal in her past and is now fighting for women s rights When Jean hears Miss Levering talk about th1907 England Jean, a young and somewhat ignorant woman, is engaged to the politician Stonor, who is up for election for Cabinet Minister At her aunt Lady John s house, she meets the beautiful and mysterious Miss Levering, an independent lady who has lived through a great deal in her past and is now fighting for women s rights When Jean hears Miss Levering talk about the horrible situation of young, poor and homeless women in England, she is shocked Slowly she gets interested in the suffragette s movement, something her fianc did not expect to be so strong But then Jean learns that Stonor s annoyance about her involvment in the matter and her interest in Miss Levering has other reasons that dive into his past.
    • [EPUB] ¿ Free Download ↠ Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts : by Elizabeth Robins ✓
      409 Elizabeth Robins
    • thumbnail Title: [EPUB] ¿ Free Download ↠ Votes for Women: A Play in Three Acts : by Elizabeth Robins ✓
      Posted by:Elizabeth Robins
      Published :2019-09-22T17:54:46+00:00

    218 Comment

    From BBC radio 3 Drama on 3 Drama on 3 presents the first of three classic plays that responded to the growing freedom of women at the turn of the twentieth century.Admired Conservative MP Geoffrey Stonor is relishing his engagement to the ebullient young heiress Jean Dunbarton until a chance encounter with the charismatic Vida Levering, an advocate of women s suffrage, appears to threaten them both not just politically, but personally too.Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

    Reviewed along with How the Vote Was Won, Other Suffragette PlaysI read Votes for Women and Other Plays and How the Vote Was Won and Other Suffragette Plays over the course of a couple of weeks, and both collections feature a few of the same plays e.g Votes for Women and How the Vote Was Won , but they also include different historic information about the plays, playwrights, and women s suffrage movement Some of the plays are little than propaganda masquerading as entertainment, but some are go [...]

    The Top 10 Books About the Suffragettes 1907 This 1907 play was written by the American actress and writer, and follows Vida Levering, a New Woman radicalised by her turbulent past and trying to use her experience to carve a better life for other women It is thought to have sparked the foundation of the Actresses Franchise League and a spate of copycat suffrage plays But I love it for its caustic lines Mad, Unsexed spits Levering These are the words today In the Middle Ages men cried out Witch a [...]

    Just read the first play unsure if it is necessary to read the others for university course yet I can understand why perhaps it would have been popular in its day if it was but other than showing me how perhaps the woman question was considered in the early twentieth century there was little that actually happened in this play to hold attention.

    This is not a play This is a piece of propaganda that bills itself as a play in order to orate at the audience Even as an oration it s still bad It lacks the artistic merit, subtlety, emotion, and power of better feminist speeches like Sojourner Truth s Ain t I A Woman.

    While I am no where near the intended audience, I appreciate the significance that this play would have on Modernist plays and on the British Suffragette movement in the early 20th century.

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